This is default featured slide 1 title
This is default featured slide 2 title
This is default featured slide 3 title
This is default featured slide 4 title
This is default featured slide 5 title
 

Monthly Archives: July 2018

Studies Readiness

Timing in handling this transitional topic is a challenge to all the scholars. They do not always have insights and necessary information to base their consideration on. Access to information is costly for some, and in most cases their school vocational guidance officers are not exposed to the latest trends. As a result they wake up very late and end up taking studies and career directions that are not well researched.

The schools and parents are encouraged to invest in mentorship program to support the scholars in their studies and career choices. However, such programs alone are not sufficient. The schools must work together with the various mentors in conceptualizing and designing educational tours to the institutions of higher learning (universities and colleges), attending studies and career fairs, exhibitions, etc.

The interaction between the schools and the industry should be effected in early years of the scholars development. The schools must employ career counselors, guidance teachers, and industry liaison officers. Companies must be encouraged to adopt schools under their Corporate Social Responsibility programs and see the scholars through to the universities. Such scholars could become scholarship recipients of these companies. Ultimately they would graduate to become their employees. However, the idea here is not for the companies to support schools for their own benefit. This is done for the benefit of the society with the hope that the economy will benefit from an educated people.

We cannot ignore the commercialization of the student information activities, like privately organised career fairs and exhibitions. They occupy the space left by the schools and education authorities. As a result such initiatives are perceived to be for the children of the middle class and the wealthy parents. There is a need for collaboration between private and public organizers. The main objective must be to assist the scholars in their studies and career readiness irrespective of their status in the society.

As the 4th industrial revolution becomes a reality, we need to be mindful of the role that technology is already playing in delivering education and the new careers emerging in the industry. The scholars must be preoccupied with the kind of careers that are going to be in existence by the time they graduate from the college/university.

It is a matter of concern to have the school career guidance offices that are poorly equipped with technology. We need digital libraries that are interactive and a place of global connectivity for the learners. They must be more than libraries but be digital information centres. The parents cannot be disengaged from their children’s studies and career ambitions. They must be observant of their children’s potential and harness it. The schools cannot be left with the responsibility of guiding these children alone. Their holistic development is a partnership.

Child to Be Smarter at Math

Before I tell you how to make this work, however, before I tell you the one step method for making your child’s math grades shoot up to an A, let me tell you the secret: you have to get your child to appreciate math as a game.

Hey, they can play video games like a world class champ! And they can program your smart phone like it is an abacus! And the difference is that they want to. And by getting them to play with numbers in a games fashion, they will want, and they will excel, and their grades will go up.

To begin with, I taught school for a number of years. First as a teacher, then owning my own private school. I used the method I am about to tell you with great success, and I got the kids to use this method during ‘play time.’ That’s right. Instead of them going out and actually playing, I got them to do math and ‘think’ (he he) they were playing.

Now, the biggest lack in math schooling, in my humble opinion, is the lack of basics. This is the times table, the addition table, the basics of how to manipulate numbers.

When I was in school (had to walk 20 miles, uphill both ways, through the driving snow) we had to do a page of tables every single day. Rain or shine, all the way through grade school, we did basic math.

Nowadays they don’t. They give a few pages in a book and think it is sufficient. It’s not. And for the simple reason that it doesn’t make math intuitive. It remains, even through high school, something they have to think about. Think. Long and hard and laborious. Any wonder why they don’t do well? The basics are TOTALLY out.

So, a page from the Case family larnin’ book. Cards.

Yep. Mama Case brought out a few decks of cards and we played. We learned how to play solitaire, and in group fashion. To this day I feel a profound happiness swell when I remember four of us, my brother, myself, my mother, and even granny! slapping those cards down, trying to beat one another, and laughing hysterically. Or crying foul when we was beat!

But the point is that we learned to look at numerical symbols and understand them. The speed at which we could differentiate a 4 from a 6, or a 9, or whatever, enabled us to win the game. So we wanted.

And, when the group wasn’t spending a night slapping cards down, we learned other games. Several forms of individual solitaire. Hearts, Rummy, whatever!

And here was an interesting bonus: when we played monopoly with the kids in the neighborhood, we became adept at reading the dice, at adding those cubes littered with one of six digits face side up!

Info of Ontario Graduate Scholarship

Key Points of the Ontario Graduate Scholarship

The key points of the Ontario scholarship include the following:

  • The scholarship worth $15,000 for each year.
  • The main eligibility criterion for an international student intends to study in Ontario is a permit from an authority.
  • The minimum period for running the graduate scholarship program is 2 consecutive terms.

Scholarship Application Process

Below are the requirements for eligibility to process the scholarship application:

  1. Applicants for the scholarship should have a first-class standard, (minimum of A-/80%) in each of the last 2 full-time academic years. This means the eligibility averages are based on grades up to August 31, 2017.
  2. You must provide transcripts from all your post-secondary institutions, whether you have your certificate already or not.
  3. Graduate transcripts are compulsory even if fall 2017 is the first term of your program.
  4. The same scholarship appliance form is also useful in evaluating a nominee for Queen Elizabeth II Graduate Scholarship in Science and Technology. The QEII-GSST is also worth $15,000 per year.
  5. You as a student have the alternative to taking up the OGS or QEII-GSST sponsorship for a minimum of 2 terms value at $10,000 or 3 terms worth of $15,000. The scholarships are non-renewable.

Evaluation Criteria

These three items are evaluation or eligibility requirements for the Ontario Graduate Scholarship:

  • An academic distinction with a weight of 30% to 50% as established by academic transcripts, scholarships, awards and honors lists.
  • Communication and leadership skill with a weight of 0% to 20% as demonstrated by a list of relevant volunteer, leadership, and academic work experience.
  • Research capability and potential in program study with a weight of 30% to 50% as confirmed by conferences, originality, presentations as well as publications.

Maximum Support

International master’s students receive an OGS or QEII-GSST award for a minimum of 2 academic years while doctoral students for a minimum of 4 academic years.

Additionally, OGS students cannot go beyond a period of 6 years of graduate awards which government funds.

  1. Tri-Agency Scholarships (CIHR, NSERC, SSHRC, Vanier)
  2. Ontario Graduate Scholarship (OGS) program.
  3. Ontario Trillium Scholarships (OTS)
  4. Queen Elizabeth II Graduate Scholarship in Science and Technology (QEII-GSST)

Reporting on Biographies

James A. Bryan grew up in rural South Carolina and moved to North Carolina at the age of fourteen for more education. Then, God made it possible for Bryan to attend and graduate from Princeton University. In 1889 he arrived in the young city of Birmingham to pastor the Third Presbyterian Church. Indeed, he became a pastor to the city of Birmingham itself.

To see how this happened, follow a day in the life of Brother Bryan of Birmingham (Chapter 5 His Daily Round):

5:30 a.m. – a younger preacher filling in for Brother Bryan’s regular driver arrived at Bryan’s home.

6:00 a.m. – they arrived for Pastor Bryan to preach to workers at a transfer company.

6:30 a.m. – Breakfast at a Greek Restaurant provided free for Brother Bryan and anyone who accompanied him. Before leaving Brother Bryan prayed for the staff at the restaurant.

7:00 a.m.-Fire Station # 4 – Brief preaching session to the firefighters.

7:45 a.m. – WKBC – Radio Station Morning Devotions – Brother Bryan sang a few lines of “Take Time to Be Holy,” prayed and spoke from Isaiah and then closed in prayer.

8:15 a.m. — Pick up donations of fruit, bread and broth for those who would listen to a message at the church later that morning. Called his wife to recount his activities and to ask about things at home and if anyone had called requesting a wedding or funeral.

9:00 a.m. — Fire Station # 1 – Brief preaching session with the firefighters.

9:30 a.m. WBRC – Commercial Radio Station with greatest reach in Birmingham. 30 minutes of preaching time.

10:00 a.m. Spoke to a women’s group about his trip to Nazareth.

10:45 a.m. At the church – checked in with Mrs. Bryan; by phone learned of the sick; thanked a friend for food; encouraged a man – ending each conversation with prayer.

11:30 a.m. Spoke to the homeless who had gathered for a meal.

12:00 p.m. Drove home for the meal Mrs. Bryan had prepared for them.

2:00 p.m. Hospital visit; home visit; pick up weekly donation of a piece of meat from butcher.

3:30 p.m. Fire Station # 7 – spoke to the Firefighters

4:00 – 5:15 p.m. various sections of the Jail as “City Chaplain.”

5:30 p.m. Checked in at Church to inquire if anyone had requested funeral or marriage.

6:00 p.m. Supper at a restaurant – again anyone who accompanies Brother Bryan pays nothing.

6:50 p.m. Tarrant City Hall – spoke to firemen.

7:30 p.m. Church meeting

8:30 p.m. Bid goodnight to “chauffeur.”